Author Topic: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems  (Read 14232 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline eskaini

  • Security Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 10842
  • I eat deleted accounts
  • Skill: Novice
Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« on: 06. October 2013, 00:43:17 »
A particular bane of open-source operating systems has been Microsoft's implementation of UEFI. Supposedly a long-needed upgrade to your BIOS, this basically allows computers to handle much larger hard-drives. Problem is, Microsoft hijacked this with Windows 8, and put in a "security measure" to ensure that - in essence - you are prevented from replacing Windows 8 with another operating system.

Having done so myself, I can confirm that provided your system's hard-drive is 1 2 terrabytes (TB) or less, then you can safely remove the .efi partition. This in turn removes the so-called "security" Microsoft installed on your behalf. The steps are thus:

1. Go into your BIOS settings and enable the CSM (Compatibility Support Module), or rather than CSM it may be called "Legacy Mode" or "BIOS Mode". This deactivates UEFI and restores legacy BIOS functionality.
2. Run Manjaro from a DVD or data-stick.
3. Completely remove all partitions from your hard-drive, including the very small but conspicuous .efi partition.
4. Install Manjaro normally. This means NOT using the "testing installer" as you don't need it (i.e. you can use the graphical installer).
5. Watch "Highlander: The Source" to celebrate your newfound freedom

Enjoy your jail-broken system, and boot up your newly installed Manjaro OS, without having to hammer a function key to get into the UEFI menu to launch it. If something goes wrong - or you just want the UEFI back - minus microsoft's addition - then Ubuntu (and Mint, I think) will automatically create one for you if you install it.

On my i5, Manjaro boots up in less than 10 seconds!  8)
« Last Edit: 04. June 2014, 11:27:05 by Rob »

Offline dnls

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 39
  • Leaving on a Jet Train
    • my blog
  • Branch: stable
  • Desktop: Xfce
  • GPU Card: ATi, nVidia, AMD
  • GPU driver: non-free
  • Kernel: linux312-x64
  • Skill: Intermediate
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #1 on: 06. October 2013, 01:35:44 »
The only advantage I see of running UEFI, it boots a little faster (ho hum...) or if you have a hard disk over 2 TB, I'm told.


Offline mandog

  • Held Mitglied
  • *****
  • Posts: 1921
  • Architect Forum And G+ Forum Owner With Daniel S
  • Branch: All
  • Desktop: Gnome, Mate, E19, Openbox,FLuxbox,Budgie, XFCE openRC,
  • GPU Card: nvidia
  • GPU driver: Non Free
  • Kernel: latest
  • Skill: Advanced
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #2 on: 06. October 2013, 02:17:49 »
That is what i did with my new motherboard it 2.2tb I run 3 x 2 tb drives with no problem.
A ENGLISHMAN IN PERU
I'm dyslexic Please do not complain about punctuation or spelling,
FANBOY,Taken from the urban dictionary
 A pathetic insult often used by fanboys themselves to try and put down people who don't like whatever it is they like.

Offline tutan_kbron

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • Branch: Stable
  • Desktop: XFCE
  • GPU Card: Intel 4400
  • Kernel: linux4.1-x64
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #3 on: 20. December 2013, 16:15:23 »
That was the only one solution to run linux in my new laptop, honestly I was afraid of deleting the efi partion, i don't know why but I didn't want to, but I can say that is no necesary at all, It works fine in a intel i5, 8 Gb ram, 1 tb HD running only Manjaro Linux
Be open mind, be open source.

Offline sparkshahalb

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Desktop: Xfce
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #4 on: 31. December 2013, 07:39:36 »
OK, but what if I want to keep the Windows 8 installation?  How do I install a dual boot with Manjaro Linux?  UEFI has screwed this up for me, and I have been unable to get it to work.  Although I would love to have a dedicated Manjaro existence, I need to work in the real world and deal with situations requiring Windows.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Offline Cris70

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • Branch: stable
  • Desktop: KDE
  • GPU Card: Intel 2nd Generation Core Processor Family Integrated Graphics Controller
  • GPU driver: free
  • Kernel: 3.18.7-1
  • Skill: Advanced
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #5 on: 31. December 2013, 09:30:42 »
VirtualBox is your friend :-)
Virtualize your Windows 8 partition, then let Manjaro take over the whole system and run Windows 8 (when you need it) inside VirtualBox.

Bye
Cris

Offline Ayceman

  • Core Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2113
  • Security Chief :P
  • Branch: stable, unstable
  • Desktop: Xfce
  • GPU Card: GTX780/HD3000/AMD8400
  • GPU driver: Nvidia/Intel/Catalyst
  • Kernel: latest stable+lts (64)
  • Skill: Advanced
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #6 on: 31. December 2013, 10:49:57 »
You can also simply disable Secure Boot - that means that you'll still boot with UEFI (quick), but there's no need to hammer anything since grub will be introduced as the main boot option. This does require the CLI installer, I think.

Offline poker98face

  • Held Mitglied
  • *****
  • Posts: 1586
  • Open your Source, Open your Mind
  • Branch: stable Arch
  • Desktop: KDE
  • GPU Card: ATI 5470
  • GPU driver: free
  • Kernel: 3.15 Arch
  • Skill: Intermediate
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #7 on: 31. December 2013, 12:07:09 »
VirtualBox is your friend :-)
Virtualize your Windows 8 partition, then let Manjaro take over the whole system and run Windows 8 (when you need it) inside VirtualBox.

Bye
Cris
Good luck if you want to run a game in VirtualBox  ::)

PC: Windows 7 Notebook: Arch

Offline fassil

  • Support Team
  • ****
  • Posts: 709
  • Branch: stable/unstable
  • Desktop: E19/E20
  • GPU driver: free
  • Kernel: Linux314 & 318
  • Skill: Intermediate
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #8 on: 02. January 2014, 11:07:35 »
Hi,
OK, but what if I want to keep the Windows 8 installation?  How do I install a dual boot with Manjaro Linux?  UEFI has screwed this up for me, and I have been unable to get it to work.  Although I would love to have a dedicated Manjaro existence, I need to work in the real world and deal with situations requiring Windows.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks.

A good (but a bit slow at boot) solution to keep a dual 8/manja in keeping each system independant at boot is REfind but you need to gently ask "redmond8" (in terminal "as admin") to let it default place with bcdedit (I don't remember the exact command...)

A+

Ps: It's like with GAG earlier (when EFI was unknown...)
« Last Edit: 02. January 2014, 11:14:02 by fassil »
"Are you enlightened ?"

Offline XStreet1985

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 38
  • Branch: Stable
  • Desktop: XFCE
  • GPU Card: Intel® HD 4000
  • GPU driver: non-free
  • Kernel: 3.10.37-1
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #9 on: 05. January 2014, 20:49:47 »
Now i cannot boot my USB Linux Live CD's installers anymore :(

I have Lenovo G580 laptop. I installed Win8 in UEFI mode, when i decided to remove it and install Manjaro, i just couldnt do it for some reason, the system simply refuses to run from USB with any linux distro on it! So i decided to remove win8 using GParted from Ubuntu 12.10 LiveCD because its the only Linux cd i had at the moment. I removed all the partitions win8 made, and installed Ubuntu 12.10 just to make a new Manjaro bootable usb using: unetbootin (formatted to Fat32). And it still refuses to run from usb. The UEFI option in bios was disabled! And the USB legacy was on, (not sure if it is the legacy OP mentioned above, but thats the only on i have). In Ubuntu i burned Manjaro image into the CD, turned UEFI off again, the live cd loaded but i could not pass the login screen. Tried manjaro as password and user name, and returned with "authentication error" + the login screen kept reloading in a never ending loop :/ At the end i just decided to install manjaro in safe mode with DOS like installer, and so here i am :)

But still i cannot solve the USB problem! Any ideas???? :'(

Offline laikexpert

  • Vollwertiges Mitglied
  • ***
  • Posts: 129
    • laikexpert
  • Branch: stable
  • Desktop: Cinnamon
  • GPU Card: Intel
  • GPU driver: non-free
  • Kernel: linux-x64
  • Skill: Advanced
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #10 on: 07. February 2014, 13:05:23 »
Make new LiveCD from this link:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/manjarodev/files/users/philm/0.8.9/0.8-r14-0204/
and try this:

enable
UEFI option in BIOS
 

boot LiveCD and maybe you have option to chose:
-UEFI Mode
-BIOS Mode

and chose BIOS Mode

---------------------------
advice:
(In the BIOS settings
look for "Secure Boot"
If there is a possibility chose
Secure Boot: Disabled
-----------------------------
In the BIOS settings
look for "Legacy Mode"
If there is a possibility chose
Legacy Mode: Enabled
-----------------------------
or
In the BIOS settings look for "CSM"
"Compatibility Support Module"
If there is a possibility chose
CSM: Enabled
That's "Legacy Mode"
-----------------------------
Try:
Win32DiskImager
tool for writing images to USB sticks)
-----------------------------------


P.S.
Long live linux
« Last Edit: 07. February 2014, 14:46:10 by laikexpert »

Offline jdeca57

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Desktop: XFce
  • GPU Card: Intel HD Graphics 520
  • Kernel: 4.3.4-1
  • Skill: Intermediate
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #11 on: 11. February 2014, 20:40:10 »
OK, but what if I want to keep the Windows 8 installation?  How do I install a dual boot with Manjaro Linux?  UEFI has screwed this up for me, and I have been unable to get it to work.  Although I would love to have a dedicated Manjaro existence, I need to work in the real world and deal with situations requiring Windows.  Any help would be appreciated.  Thanks.
Windows 8 doesn't require UEFI else there would be no possibility of upgrading Windows 7 on older machines. I have 2 systems with Windows 8 and an HD < 2GB simply with the older mbr. It works with dual-boot like W7. I'm not certain how to modify the way of booting (UEFI to Non-UEFI) since I bought them the way they are. But Windows 8 or 8.1 works perfectly in non UEFI dual-boot. And I guess (no promise) that it is possible to change the method.
Linux Counter 403003

Offline spaarks

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #12 on: 24. February 2014, 15:19:25 »
Acer Aspire One 725
On my system Windows 8 DOES require UEFI.
When I enable 'legacy' Win8 will NOT boot. Only Linux will boot.
When I enable UEFI Linux will not boot - the bios does not even see the USB stick or USB CD ROM.
I have tried several distros - manjaro, ubuntu, pclos, fedora - none will work with UEFI enabled.


Offline MrMagoo

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Branch: stable
  • Desktop: Xfce
  • GPU Card: Tinkcenter, AMD readon HD 6670
  • GPU driver: free
  • Kernel: linux38x86
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #13 on: 12. December 2015, 17:54:58 »
A big thank for your help

I have been struggling with a Toshiba satellite AMD8, for a week and half to install Manjaro 15.09 64bits XFCE, as a stand alone on the hard drive.

I have recuperate it after the previous owner thru it in the garbage because he was tired of Win8 intrusion and bizarre configuration. The weirdest of all he want for a new portable with Win 10. That is his problem let's say that some people never learn.

But that said, my reply to your post is to thank you and all the experience members who take the time to post information for us newbees. During this weekend I have tried the solution of JCChristian in (Manjaro UEFI-install guide) it did not work on this particular machine. I also tried Laikexpert solution from one of your reply but something went wrong it did not work properly. Then I followed your solution to the letter.

In conclusion, Now that I am free THANK YOU ALL for your support
Conversion to Linux finalized :))
Manjaro15.12 XFCE=On bootable DD Lenovo Thinkcenter, Mageia5 KDE=Toshiba Satellite, Solydx2016 XFCE= Thinkpad,
MX15 XFCE=Sony Viao
Window, OS x= Not for me, adios

Offline austino71

  • Neuling
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • I'm new. Be nice!
  • Branch: Stable
  • Desktop: KDE
  • GPU Card: Nvidia 610m
  • Skill: Novice
Re: Yes, you can safely remove UEFI on some systems
« Reply #14 on: 25. December 2015, 22:01:55 »
Make new LiveCD from this link:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/manjarodev/files/users/philm/0.8.9/0.8-r14-0204/
and try this:

enable
UEFI option in BIOS
 

boot LiveCD and maybe you have option to chose:
-UEFI Mode
-BIOS Mode

and chose BIOS Mode

---------------------------
advice:
(In the BIOS settings
look for "Secure Boot"
If there is a possibility chose
Secure Boot: Disabled
-----------------------------
In the BIOS settings
look for "Legacy Mode"
If there is a possibility chose
Legacy Mode: Enabled
-----------------------------
or
In the BIOS settings look for "CSM"
"Compatibility Support Module"
If there is a possibility chose
CSM: Enabled
That's "Legacy Mode"
-----------------------------
Try:
Win32DiskImager
tool for writing images to USB sticks)
-----------------------------------


P.S.
Long live linux
My laptop Asus k53sd...there's no such option to disable secure boot
« Last Edit: 25. December 2015, 22:08:00 by austino71 »