Author Topic: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter  (Read 2726 times)

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Offline Chrysostomus

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Re: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter
« Reply #15 on: 26. March 2016, 15:40:46 »
That is true. However, it does not take away the learning curve. It is not quite as beginner friendly as... well, any complete desktop environment. I3 edition is a complete desktop environment built around i3 wm. Bspwm edition is more barebones, and just offers you some core components around which you can build your own desktop.

But anyway, if you have ideas how to make it more approachable, I'm game.

Offline Doaxan

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Re: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter
« Reply #16 on: 27. March 2016, 23:46:51 »
Well, there is place for Manjaro spins who explicitly targer low RAM systems, imho. Users who want more easy to use features can install KDE, can't they?
I have 16 gb ram and I used to be a user the kde, but acquainted with tile i3 wm, I realized that this is the next step in the development, it is much more convenient to ordinary de. After I learned about bspwm, it is more suitable for my requirements.
It is a pity that bspwm little documentation, it is very difficult to understand the beginner (me). Personally, I like this bspwm view:
https://www.reddit.com/r/unixporn/comments/4bt8hv/bspwm_skye/
and
https://www.reddit.com/r/unixporn/comments/3cdhz0/bspwm_after_4_months_with_bspwm_i_finally_made_my/

Offline eugen-b

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Re: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter
« Reply #17 on: 28. March 2016, 00:22:49 »
If I am correct, the bspwm spin is also targeted at newbies who want to try bspwm/tiling WMs.
It looks like it is. At least you don't have to set it up yourself the Arch way. But don't expect too much and expect some issues. Having said that I found the config files in ~/.bspwm to be really well commented. And Chrysostomus answered all my n00b questions so I was even able to get CPU, RAM and sensors monitors on the panel with his help.
I have 16 gb ram and I used to be a user the kde, but acquainted with tile i3 wm, I realized that this is the next step in the development, it is much more convenient to ordinary de. After I learned about bspwm, it is more suitable for my requirements.
It is a pity that bspwm little documentation, it is very difficult to understand the beginner (me). Personally, I like this bspwm view:
https://www.reddit.com/r/unixporn/comments/4bt8hv/bspwm_skye/
and
https://www.reddit.com/r/unixporn/comments/3cdhz0/bspwm_after_4_months_with_bspwm_i_finally_made_my/
I also like different crazy looks, but I also realized the hard and good work of Chrysostomus limepanel, gtk-menu and other nice stuff. So I even eventually removed my vertical LXpanel, because  what is there is good enough.
And the one of the most important points to me about this editon is to appreciate minimalism.

What would be the alternative to minimalism? Edit the settings of LXDE, Xfce or Gnome to use bspwm as window manager? Let's try and report back the result! :)

You probably know, but at the end of Arch Wiki article there are also some additional links https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Bspwm
MSI Wind Nettop, Intel Atom 230 1.6GHz (64bit), 2GB RAM
DEs: NET-minimal + (LXDE / Fluxbox / JWM); LXQt OpenRC
how to install on btrfs subvolumes
http://manjaro.github.io/donate/

Offline Chrysostomus

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Re: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter
« Reply #18 on: 28. March 2016, 14:06:47 »
Yeah, part of problem with bspwms documentation is that not everything is up to date since the last big update. Make no mistake, the man page is superb and up to date, but it is not easy to understand or apply for beginner. Another problem is that this edition has huge amount of custom stuff for which there is no documentation.

 I have tried to comment the configuration files, and there is some general documentation. But there would really be a need for more documentation. Too bad I dpn't have enough time to implement it. So I try to use this forum for documentation.

If you have any specific questions, I'm glad to help. I think I have sorted through most bspwm material available in the internet looking for inspiration for this edition.

Offline Chrysostomus

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Re: Trimming down the fat - how to make bspwm edition lighter
« Reply #19 on: 28. March 2016, 15:24:34 »
I don't think using a different wm with gnome-session is worth it, because you give up most things that make up gnome. Better to just run gnome-settings daemon from autostart so you can use gnome-control-center.

With xfce using xfce-session management is more feasible, but I have found that using bspwm autostart is more simple and works better here too. Partly because you cannot specify disable-wm-check option for xfdesktop and xfce4-panel if you use xfce's native autostart. Just put into your autostart file
Code: [Select]
xfsettingsd &And optionally
Code: [Select]
xfce4-power-manager &
xfce4-panel -d &
xfdesktop -D &
Depending on what parts you want to use.

For lxqt, I would use the lxqt session manager.